Skip Navigation

Vale of Neath and Dulais Valley

Vale of Neath


The Vale of Neath is of great natural beauty, indulging visitors with splendid scenery including the popular ‘Waterfall Country’.

It is the Vale of Neath’s landscape and its natural and industrial history which has attracted well-known names such as JMW Turner to paint here. The time that the renowned naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace spent in the Vale of Neath in the early 20th Century inspired him to say that, ‘I cannot call to mind a single valley that in the same extent of country comprises so much beautiful and picturesque scenery and so many interesting and special features as the Vale of Neath’

If you are looking for waterfall walks, at Aberdulais Falls you will discover a completely accessible waterfall with a lift to the main attraction. Just a few miles down the valley in Resolven you will find Melincwrt Waterfall which includes a short 15 minute walk to an impressive 80ft high waterfall. Those looking for more challenging waterfall walks often head to Sgwd Gwladys at Pontneddfechan and the surrounding waterfalls within Brecon Beacons National Park.

The Neath and Tenant Canals meander through this historic landscape, on a walk along the Tennant Canal you will pass the majestic 12th century Neath Abbey leading into the town of Neath with its 14th century Castle.

Neath Town Centre, with its thriving indoor market, is home to popular high street names and independent retailers along with an excellent selection of café’s, pubs, restaurants and hotels. The Neath Food and Drink Festival is also held in Neath Town Centre each year in early October.

Why not explore our valleys on foot using our excellent public transport network, visit the Travel Adventures Wales website to discover routes in the Vale of Neath that can be accessed through public transport. 

Vale of Neath Guide
File type Document File size
pdf Vale of Neath Guide. 3.58 MB

Dulais Valley

The stunning views of the Brecon Beacons provide a picturesque setting from the top of the Dulais Valley. Once home to many collieries, the valley has largely been reclaimed by nature, now the scenery is serene and wildlife is plentiful.

Steeped in history, the area was once occupied by the Romans, who built two Roman forts in the nearby area.

At the village of Banwen stands the gateway to Sarn Helen, an important Roman road which linked Neath in the South to Caernarfon in North Wales. Sarn Helen is now a picturesque, though challenging, walking route which spans the length of the Valley.

Did you think that St Patrick, the patron Saint of Ireland was Irish? Then think again because it is said that he actually hails from the village of Banwen.  At Banwen Ponds you will find tributes to the man himself and a walk around the fishing ponds which are located conveniently close to the excellent quality village café offers beautiful views of the surrounding Brecon Beacons.

Cefn Coed Colliery Museum is located in the village of Crynant and was once the deepest anthracite coal mine in the world, the museum now offers exhibitions and guided tours around the old colliery buildings. Explore the fascinating history of the Dulais Valley by following the Dulais Valley Heritage Trail.

Why not explore our valleys on foot using our excellent public transport network, visit the Travel Adventures Wales website to discover routes in the Dulais Valley that can be accessed through public transport. 

Dulais Valley Guide
File type Document File size
pdf Dulais Valley Guide 2.76 MB